Nokia imagines technology in 2015

[tweetmeme] What does the future look like? Gadgets without keyboards, touchscreen devices, and phones that feature augmented reality, GPS, web browsing, and more. See for yourself in the video below.

Although clearly just concepts at this point, the devices shown in the animated video paint a picture of how we’ll be using devices and services. Connecting to TV, so we can share TV watching experiences with people on the other side of the world, or even using the mobile device as a projector. Contextual awareness plays a big part too, with the device working together with the cloud, both pulling information down to the device, and also sending information back.

Take the fisherman in India. Not only is he using his device to get the best prices for his fish, but he’s making extra money by selling his data to overseas universities who can tap into his and other fishermen’s information for their research.

It might not be a single device either. We saw an example of the user who’s main device is his mobile computer, acts as a satnav and a multimedia centre – much as our devices do today. However Mr 2015 also has a smaller, sub device which he can use for sport. With the same interface as his main device, and the addition of the cloud, means he can move seamlessly between the two.

Of course, this is all still conceptual, but we can see easily how the services and strategy being laid down today form the backbone of the lives we’ll be living tomorrow.

Recharge devices from your window

[tweetmeme] Batteries are an integral part of our lives in the 21st century and regardless of whether you use single use batteries or rechargeable batteries it is essential that you use them effectively so that you get the most out of your battery investment.

Rechargeable batteries currently are used for applications such as automobile starters, portable consumer devices, light vehicles (such as motorized wheelchairs, golf carts, electric bicycles, and electric forklifts), tools, and uninterruptible power supplies. Emerging applications in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles are driving the technology to reduce cost, reduce weight, and increase lifetime.Unlike non-rechargeable batteries, rechargeable batteries have to be charged before use. The need to charge rechargeable batteries before use deterred potential buyers who needed to use the batteries immediately. However, new low self discharge batteries allow users to purchase rechargeable battery that already hold about 70% of the rated capacity, allowing consumers to use the batteries immediately and recharge later.

Now what would make these rechargeable batteries even more green would be to charge the batteries off the grid. Several alternatives to rechargeable batteries exist or are under development. For uses like portable radios and flashlights, rechargeable batteries may be replaced by clockwork mechanisms or dynamos which are cranked by the user to provide power. For transportation, uninterruptible power supply systems and laboratories, flywheel energy storage systems store energy in a spinning rotor for reconversion to electric power when needed; such systems may be used to provide large pulses of power that would otherwise be objectionable on a common electrical grid. One such solution that is coming in the form of an interesting product is the window battery charger.

The time being this is a concept which, despite a successful idea which underlies it, may not be realized. Not all are willing to pay for more expensive solar panels, preferring to charge the batteries in the traditional way. Charger reNEW Solar Battery Charger has two slots: the upper is placed battery that needs recharging, which is charged, automatically drops out of the lower slot.

Solar panels are located on the rear of the device. Charging can be placed either on the table, as shown in the image, or using suction cups attach to the window.